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Lake Lucerne Introduction

Lake Lucerne is located in the central part of Switzerland, and it is the 4th biggest lake in the country. 

The lake has an odd shape, with arms and bends that reach from Lucerne all the way to the mountains. It has an area of about 44 square miles, a height of about 1,400 feet, and it has a maximum depth of roughly 700 feet. Most of the shoreline rises up into the mountains at a far distance above Lake Lucerne, and there are a number of picturesque views that include those of Mount Pilatus and Mount Rigi. 

The Reuss River has its exit at Lucerne. It also receives the Sarner Aa, Engelberger Aa, and Muota. 

The lake can be circumnavigated by road, but the route is pretty twisted, slow, and you have to go through tunnels for some of the way. Passenger boats and steamers move between the individual towns on Lake Lucerne. A lot of tourists frequent the lake, both people from Switzerland and people from abroad, and there are a lot of resorts and hotels on the lake’s shores. Furthermore, the Rutli meadow, which is the official site of the Swiss Confederation’s founding, is located on the lake’s southeast shore. A long commemorative path, the Swiss Path, was created around Lake Lucerne to celebrate the 700th anniversary of the country.

Geography 

Lake Lucerne is on the border of the three original cantons of Switzerland (Unterwalden, Schwyz, and Uri). It is also located in Lucerne canton. Several of the most ancient communities of the country are on the shore, including Treib, Altdorf, Gersau, Vitznau, and Weggis. 

Lake Lucerne has an irregular shape, and it seems to lie in four separate valleys, all associated with one another by the conformation of the nearby mountains. The central part of the lake is in a couple of parallel valleys, and their direction is from the west to the east, and one is north, and the other is south of the Burgenstock ridge. The geography is very complex and interesting, and a study of the geography alone is a worthwhile endeavor.

Cultural References To Lake Lucerne 

“Moonlight” Sonata by Beethoven gets its name from a description by a music critic, who compared the first movement to moonlight shining on this lake. Rossini also used this in a classical music piece.

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