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Lambach

Lambach, conveniently located on the left bank of the Traun River, grew rich in the Middle Ages thanks to the flourishing salt trade. Around 1040 Count Arnold II Wels-Lambach and his wife Regilinda transformed the family seat into a monastery. Their son, Bishop Adalberto, who was later canonized, invited Benedictine monks here in 1089. In the same year, the Lambach monks established a second monastery at Melk which, eventually, was to surpass the mother abbey in terms of status and beauty. The abbey church was mostly rebuilt in the 17th century; rebuilding of the abbey itself was completed 50 years later. The Baroque interior of the church is very beautiful, but Lambach owes its fame primarily to the Romanesque frescoes, probably dating from the 11th century. Unique in Austria, they are considered to be one of Europe’s most resplendent examples of Romanesque art. At their centre is the Madonna with Child, to the left the Adoration of the Magi, who present gifts to the Holy Infant. The south vault depicts Jerusalem and Herod’s palace. The abbey treasury also holds the Romanesque chalice of Bishop Adalbert and precious monstrances and chasubles. Also on view are ceiling paintings by Martino Altomonte and Martin Johann Schmidt. The musical archives hold a copy of Mozart’s Lambacher Symphonie, which the composer reputedly created while staying here. Lambach also has a beautifully preserved Rococo theatre.

Lambach Photo Gallery

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