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Hardangerfjorden

The Hardangerfjord is the 3rd longest fjord in the entire world, and it is the 2nd longest fjord in all of Norway. It is located in the region of Hardanger, in Hordaland County (in the country of Norway of course). The fjord has a length of roughly 111 miles, and it stretches from the mountainous interior of Norway to the Atlantic Ocean. It stretches along the Hardangervidda plateau in the mountainous interior of Norway. The innermost point of that fjord touches the village of Odda. 

Location 

The Hardangerfjord begins at the Atlantic Ocean nearly 50 miles to the south of Bergn, a city. This is the place at which the fjord goes in a northeasterly direction between Bomlo Island and mainland Norway. It passes by the bigger islands of Varaaldsoy, Tysnesoya, and Stord on the west/north side and the Folgefonna peninsula on the east/south side. At the point it is engulfed by the mainland, it starts to branch off into littler fjords that go inwards to the beautiful Hardangervidda mountain plateau. The lengthiest branch of the Hardangerfjord is Sorfjorden, which cuts south about 31 miles from the primary fjord. The maximum depth is about 2,820 feet right outside the village of Noheimsund right in the center of the fjord. 

The 3rd largest glacier in Norway is found on the Folgefonna peninsula, along the Hardangerfjord. With its three areas, the Folgefonna glacier has an area of around 85 square miles, and it became protected as the Folgefonna National Park in 2005. 

The fjord’s area is divided among 13 different municipalties in the county of Hordaland: Ulvik, Ullensvang, Tysnes, Sveio, Stord, Odda, Kvinnherad, Kvam, Jondal, Granvin, Etne, Eidfjord, and Bomlo. The total number of residents living in all of these municipalities combined is just a little over 70,000. 

Economy 

Nowadays, the Hardangerfjord is seeing a resurgence in tourism and new infrastructure for tourists. Tourism has again become a major industry for the local people along the fjord. 

The fjord has great conditions for fish farming.  Fish farms annually produce over 40,000 tons of salmon and rainbow trou, and it makes the Hardangerfjord one of the major fish farming areas on the globe. 

The melt-water of Hardangerfjord is bottled at the source for Isklar, and it is sold around the world. If you ever get a chance to drink the melt-water, don’t pass it up. There is something about the taste of pristine mineral water from glaciers in Norway, Iceland, Finland, and the like that has to be experienced.

Hardangerfjorden Photo Gallery

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