...

Dachsteinhohlen

The caves in the slopes of the Dachstein range are among Austria’s most beautiful and fascinating natural monuments. The vast caves, one of the largest systems on Earth and millions of years old, are covered by 500-yearold permafrost. After the last Ice Age, underground waters created strange ice mountains, glaciers and frozen waterfalls. The most interesting of these is the Rieseneishohle (Giant Ice Cave). The caverns in this surreal underground ice-world are named after King Arthur and the Celtic heroes, Parsifal and Tristan. The most arresting cavern formation is the socalled Ice Chapel. A little further along, also in a limestone wall of Dachstein, is the entrance to a second system of caves, known as Mammuthohle (Mammoth Caves), so named because of their size rather than after the prehistoric mammal. These caves do not have ice formations, but there is a spectacular light show. Both networks of caves can be reached via paths starting from the first cable-car station. The sightseeing route leads through a labyrinthine network of tunnels, gorges and chambers that stretch over 44 km (27 miles), with a 1,200 m (4,000 ft) change in altitude. Individual caverns have been given evocative names such as the Realm of Shadows or Midnight Cathedral. Also worth seeing is a third cave, Koppenbrullerhohle, which has a giant water source and is considered to be the largest water cave in the Dachstein massif. All caves are open to the public only during the spring and summer seasons (May to Oct; Koppenbrullerhohle May to Sep). When visiting the caves, especially the ice caves, make sure you take plenty of warm clothing.

Dachsteinhohlen Photo Gallery

Dachsteinhohlen
Dachsteinhohlen: 01 photo Dachsteinhohlen Dachsteinhohlen: 01 photo
Dachsteinhohlen
Dachsteinhohlen: 02 photo Dachsteinhohlen Dachsteinhohlen: 02 photo
© 2010-2017 gabisworld.com Contact Us